The Baganda had a centralised system of government which by 1750 was the most well organised in the interlacustrine region.
The head of the state was the king known as Kabaka. Previously the Bataka had a lot of political influence. They enjoyed a position almost simlilar to that of Kabaka.

However after 175O, the Kabaka assumed a position of political importance far superior to the ranks of the Bataka. The Kabaka’s position was hereditary but it was not confined to any one clan because the king would take the clan of his mother. The Kabaka used to marry from as many clans as possible and this encouraged loyalty to the throne in the sense that each of the fifty-two clans hoped that it would one day produce the king.

The other persons who occupied positions of political and social importance were: the Prime Minister known as the Katikiro, the Mugema, the royal sister known as Nalinya, the Queen mother known as Namasole and the Naval and Army commanders referred to as Gabunga and Mujasi respectively.

The kingdom was divided into administrative units known as Amasaza (counties) which were further sub-divided into Amagombolola (sub-counties), and these were sub-divided into parishes called Emiruka which were subdivided into sub-parishes. The smallest unit was known as Bukungu which was more or less a village unit. All the chiefs at all levels were appointed by the Kabaka and they were directly responsible to him. He could appoint or dismiss any chief at will. After 1750, chieftainship was no longer hereditary. Chieftainship was accorded on clan basis but only to men of merit and distinguished service.

——————————————————————————–

Clans of Buganda and totems

Lugave

Pangolin

Mutima

Heart

Ngeye

Colobus monkey

Nte

Cow

Ffumbe

Civet cat

Nkima

Velvet

Nnyonyi

Bird

Lukato

Stilito

Nsenene

Grasshopper

Njaza

Reedbuck

Mbogo

Buffalo

Ngo

Leopard

Ngabi

Bushbuck

Kasimba

Genet

Nkerebwe

Squirrel

Mpologoma

Lion

Kayozi

Kangaroo Rat

Mbwa

Dog

Ndiga

Sheep

Ngonge

Otter

Mpeewo

Oribi Antelope

Kibe

Jackal

Musu

Edible Rat

Nvuma

Seed

Babiito

Clan of Kooki

Butiko

Mushroom

Baboobi

Ntalaganya

Blue Drinker

Nkejje

Tiny fish

Mpindi

Pea

Kinyomo

Black Rat

Kkobe

Yam

Nsuma

Snout fish

Nvubu

Hippo

Nswaswa

Monitor lizard

Njovu

Elephant

Nnamungoona

Crow

Mmamba

Lung fish

Today, however, the number of clans has risen to 52. The emergent clans include Mbuzi, Nkula, Njobe, Nakisinge, Nyange, Ngali, Ndisa, Kikuba, Nkebuka, Nsunu, Kasanke, etc.

The authenticity of these clans depends on the following:

  • They should indicate their Bubiro and how they acquired them.
  • They should indite their Butaka.They should indicate which Kabaka gave them the Butaka.
  • They indicate which role or historical function they performed. They should present a genealogical chart of their ruling Kasyolya, going back to the founder.

The articulation of the above probes would not only go a long way in accrediting these emergent clans, but it would provide a peace of mind to both the contemporary and future generations. Certainly then, the spirits of Kaggwa, Zimbe, Musoke, Miti, Nsimbi, Kasirye and others would repose in peace.

The cause for trepidation is the unfortunate fact that because of the general anarchy of the last three decades, Ugandans have developed a tendency towards social disintegration and dissipation. They exhibit a mania for devalued quantity and an obsession for cheap numbers. Let it be ardently hoped therefore that this rampant craze for random proliferation does not succeed in inching its way into the venerable Clan system of Buganda.

©2019 KLEO Template a premium and multipurpose theme from Seventh Queen

CONTACT US

We're not around right now. But you can send us an email and we'll get back to you, asap.

Sending

Log in with your credentials

Forgot your details?